Instead of Jar Packaging, Try Literally Anything Other Than Jar Packaging

Another day, another installment of Instead of [BLANK], Try [BLANK]! If you gain one useful habit from my poorly neglected blog, it should be to pH test your products to maintain the health of your acid mantle. If you gain two habits, it should be the pH thing and that jar packaging is LITERALLY THE WORST.

Jar packaging is dumb and ineffective and tantamount to storing your products in a dirty mop bucket.   Continue reading

Black Friday Beauty: Leftover DIY

Happy Black Friday! This Thanksgiving, I was grateful for elastic-waist pants. After cooking, then cleaning up the kitchen, then eating (and the meat sweats and indigestion that follow), I’m in no mood to fight the crowds and snag some Black Friday bargains. I could use a day of relaxation and pampering. For anyone who empathizes with my post-feast pain and has some leftover pumpkin lying around, you can make this mask by kickass aesthetician and YouTube guru Veronica Gorgeois.

Not Your Grandma’s Beauty Routine…Except It Is Your Grandma’s Beauty Routine

This post is inspired by the book Health and Beauty Hints, published by Cupples & Leon in New York in 1910. The how-to hair and skincare guide for Gibson Girls can be viewed in full here.

My takeaway is this: the days before modern, science-based skincare were dark, indeed. Apparently, our forebears thought a double chin could be massaged out of existence, as “[rubbing] vigorously [will] wear away the fat by friction.” Additionally, children’s hair should not be allowed to grow too long because it could “draw nourishment away” from the body.

Moreover, ingredients  have come a long way since 1910. I’d prefer a vitamin C serum over a face full of spermaceti any day.

That said, they got some things right. The book advises moisturizing with a cream partially composed of sweet almond oil, which contains linoleic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid and general skin-nurturing superstar). It also reminds women that hair, skin and hands are subject to drying conditions in winter and thus deserve a little moisturizing TLC during colder months.

The bottom line: Health and Beauty Hints deserves at least a quick parsing, if only for the fantastic photography and wacky pseudo-science.

Instead of [BLANK], Try [BLANK]

Instead of a baking soda facial treatment, try a baking soda nail whitener!

As previously discussed, baking soda (pH 8.3)  is far too alkaline for use on facial skin, as it will neutralize and strip away the protective acid mantle (pH 4.5-5.6). I’m amazed and disappointed that there are still people out there toting the benefits of baking soda as a facial mask or scrub. Pro tip: if a product can be used to scrub away hard water residue or stains on your toilet bowl, it’s probably not a good idea to slather it all over thin, delicate facial skin. Continue reading